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PENZ_17035_NRC_Data-evaluation.pdf (9.55 MB)

Evaluation of geospatial datasets and recognition of landscape gradients specific to water quality

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posted on 2024-06-21, 03:59 authored by Clint Rissman, Tapuwa Marapara, Simon Bloomberg, Jessie Lindsay, Lisa Pearson
This study evaluates the landscape relationships and suitability of existing geospatial datasets for the purposes of mapping physiographic water quality units for the Northland region. The physiographic method seeks to explain 'how' and 'why' water quality varies across a region by identifying the gradients driving key landscape processes that govern water quality outcomes and risk. The importance of understanding the role of the landscape reflects the observation that whilst land use is a prerequisite for poor water quality outcomes, it is the inherent physical, chemical and biological characteristics (attributes) of a landscape that are often responsible for a larger proportion (>2 times) of the variation in water quality outcomes. This is particularly true for regions and/or countries, such as Northland and New Zealand, which are characterised by steep gradients in chemical, physical and biological landscape attributes. e3 Scientific Report for Northland Regional Council

Funding

Funded by the New Zealand Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment's Our Land and Water National Science Challenge (Toitū te Whenua, Toiora te Wai) as part of project Physiographic Environments of New Zealand

History

Publication date

2017-11-07

Language

  • English

Does this contain Māori information or data?

  • No

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