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White clover: the forgotten component of high producing pastures?

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posted on 2023-05-03, 20:21 authored by Gerald CosgroveGerald Cosgrove, Julia Lee
• Understanding how white clover grows and interacts with ryegrass allows farmers to manage pastures for greater white clover content. • Timing of the first grazing of newly sown pasture is important; it should occur when white clover seedlings are small rosettes and before lateral expansion of the plant begins, to avoid damaging new stolons. • Between 1 and 2.5 years after sowing the clover taproot dies and the plant fragments into smaller plants. At this time, farmers often observe a decline in clover content. • Two factors that influence the ability of white clover to thrive are nitrogen and light. White clover content is improved through pasture management, including strategic N fertiliser use, that reduces shading from ryegrass.

History

Rights statement

© Copyright 2011 DairyNZ Limited. All rights reserved.

Language

  • English

Does this contain Māori information or data?

  • No

Publisher

DairyNZ Ltd

Journal title

Technical Series

ISSN

2230-2395

Citation

Cosgrove, G. & Lee, J. (2016). White clover: the forgotten component of high producing pastures? Technical Series, 32, 1–4.

Funder

Core Funding

Contract number

A19054

Job code

50166X02

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