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Detection of invertebrate suppressive soils, and identification of a possible biological control agent for Meloidogyne nematodes using high resolution rhizosphere microbial community analysis

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posted on 2023-05-03, 17:55 authored by Nigel BellNigel Bell, Katharine Adam, Rhys Jones, Richard JohnsonRichard Johnson, Faith MtandavariFaith Mtandavari, Gabriela Burch, Vanessa Cave, Catherine CameronCatherine Cameron, Paul MacleanPaul Maclean, Alison PopayAlison Popay, Damien Fleetwood
White clover (Trifolium repens) is the key legume component of New Zealand pastoral agriculture due to the high quality feed and nitrogen inputs it provides. Invertebrate pests constrain white clover growth and this study investigated rhizosphere-associated fungal controls for two of these pests and attempts to disentangle the underpinning mechanisms. The degree of suppressiveness of 10 soils, in a latitudinal gradient down New Zealand, to added Meloidogyne hapla and Costelytra zealandica scarab larvae was measured in untreated soil. Most of the soils showed no suppressive activity against these pests but two showed activity against M. hapla and two against C. zealandica. Rhizosphere fungi responsible for pest suppressive responses were elucidated via next-generation sequencing. In the M. hapla-suppressive soils nematode-trapping Orbiliomycetes fungi were present in significantly greater abundance than non-suppressive soils and their abundance increased further with addition of M. hapla. A comparison of plant growth and the rhizosphere fungal community between untreated and irradiated soil was carried out on five of the ten soils using Pyronota as the scarab larvae. Soil irradiation either: reduced (by 60–70%); increased (16×) or made no difference to white clover growth across the five soils tested, illustrating the range of microbial impacts on plant production. In one of the M. hapla suppressive soils irradiation resulted in a significant increase in nematode galling suggesting that Orbiliomycetes fungi were indeed responsible for the suppressive effect. Lack of consistent changes in soil macronutrients and pH post-irradiation suggest these were not responsible for plant or invertebrate responses. The use of next generation sequencing in controlled pot trials has allowed identification of a potential biological control organism and bioindicator for M. hapla suppression.

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Rights statement

© 2016 Bell, Adam, Jones, Johnson, Mtandavari, Burch, Cave, Cameron, Maclean, Popay and Fleetwood. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

Language

  • English

Does this contain Māori information or data?

  • No

Publisher

Frontiers Media S.A.

Journal title

Frontiers in Plant Science

ISSN

1664-462X

Citation

Bell, N. L., Adam, K. H., Jones, R. J., Johnson, R. D., Mtandavari, Y. F., Burch, G., Cave, V., Cameron, C., Maclean, P., Popay, A. J., & Fleetwood, D. (2016). Detection of invertebrate suppressive soils, and identification of a possible biological control agent for Meloidogyne nematodes using high resolution rhizosphere microbial community analysis. Frontiers in Plant Science, 7, 1946. doi:10.3389/fpls.2016.01946

Funder

Ministry of Business Innovation & Employment

Contract number

A20140

Job code

294055

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